EMS Professional - Florida PMD (2 Years)

3 5

155 Courses

Enjoy access to all EMS Professional Advanced courses for 2 Years. These courses are approved for Florida PMDs. Each course comes with one continuing education certificate and can be replayed an unlimited number of times.

12-Lead ECG Interpretation Part 1 and Part 2 (ALS)

2 hrs
4 5

This two part course on 12-Lead ECG interpretation is intended for providers who know the basics about obtaining an electrocardiogram and want to know more about interpretation. This course assumes that a good understanding of interpreting a 3-Lead ECG and working knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the heart. Part 1 of the course describes the flow of electrical impulses through the heart, organization of an ECG tracing, and signs of myocardial ischemia and infarction that are detectable with an ECG. Part 2 of the course introduces other conditions detectable with an ECG and provides opportunities to practice. Note: users need to complete part 1 and part 2 course components to receive 2.0 hours of CECBEMS approved advanced CE hours.

Part 1
• Describe the flow of electrical impulses through the heart
• Discuss how an ECG tracing is organized
• Learn signs of ischemia and myocardial infarction that are detectable with an ECG

Part 2
• Introduce other conditions that are detectable with an ECG and *
• Practice reading ECGs.

Abdominal Emergencies (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Abdominal emergencies are never fun and often can be bloody, messy, and smelly. Most importantly, abdominal emergencies can be mysterious and the most challenging emergencies in medicine. In this course we will explore abdominal anatomy, abdominal emergency assessment, and use some case studies to distinguish emergent from non-emergent abdominal pain.

• Review abdominal cavity anatomy
• Learn to assess the patient with an abdominal complaint
• Discuss general abdominal emergency treatment
• Review abdominal emergency cases

Acute Coronary Syndrome (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In this course, learn and explore the assessment and treatment of acute coronary syndrome. The course begins by defining ACS and how to assess ACS. Learn the different types of ACS. The course concludes by exploring the treatment and transportation triage situations for acute considerations.

• Understand what acute coronary syndrome is
• Understand how to assess for an acute coronary syndrome
• Learn to differentiate types of acute coronary syndrome
• Explore treatment and transportation triage situations for acute considerations

Advanced Shock Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

EMS professionals are taught basic shock assessment and management early in training, but a more thorough understanding of what shock is, what happens to the body when shock occurs, and how to recognize shock will help you choose an appropriate treatment plan. Part 1 of this course explores anatomy and physiology of circulation and oxygenation, and how to recognize the complications created in shock states.

• Understand anatomy and physiology of normal circulation and oxygenation
• Recognize the complications created in shock states

Advanced Shock Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

EMS professionals are taught basic shock assessment and management early in training, but a more thorough understanding of what shock is, what happens to the body when shock occurs, and how to recognize shock will help you choose an appropriate treatment plan. Part 2 reviews shock signs and symptoms, and how to use your knowledge to manage the patient with shock.

• Understand shock signs and symptoms
• Use knowledge to manage shock patient

A Functional Approach to Physical Fitness for Emergency Responders

1 hr
4 5

In 2004 the U.S. Fire Administration reported 117 firefighter fatalities in the line of duty. As in other years, the leading cause of death was overexertion. Firefighting is one of the most physically demanding jobs. In seconds an emergency responder transitions from a state of rest to peak and sustained aerobic and anaerobic activity that might last minutes or hours. It is critical that all emergency response personnel maintain a good level of physical fitness. This course describes and demonstrates functional training exercises for emergency responder tasks.

• Discuss line of duty fatalities and on the job injuries
• Describe how “functional training” is different than traditional training
• Demonstrate CORE strengthening and flexibility exercises
• Demonstrate functional fitness exercises for emergency responder tasks

Allergic Reaction Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

An allergic reaction is an exaggerated immune response to a particular substance. About 41 million Americans have allergic sensitivities that put them at risk for developing the most severe form of allergic reaction—anaphylaxis. Recognize the signs and symptoms of progression, from nuisance reaction to anaphylaxis. Learn prompt recognition and early treatment with epinephrine, paramount to anaphylaxis survival.

• Discuss the causes and physiology of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis
• Recognize the signs and symptoms of a severe allergic reaction
• Understand treatments for patients suffering a severe allergic reaction

Altitude Illness (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Altitude illness affects those who ascend to high altitudes too quickly. It generally only occurs over 8,000 feet, but has been observed at lower altitudes. In its mildest form, it can be merely irritating, but at its most severe, it can be fatal. In this course, learn the causes, assessment, and treatment for altitude illness.

• Be familiar with the current understanding of the pathophysiology of altitude illness.
• Be able to assess the presence and the severity of altitude illness in different body systems.
• Be able to describe treatment plans necessary to slow down and reverse the adverse effects of altitude on the human body.
• Be able to determine when ALS intervention is required, and for ALS providers, implement pharmacological interventions.

Animal Bite Assessment and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

It is estimated that dog bites result in 750,000 ER visits, 6000 hospitalizations, and twenty fatalities per year. Learn causes of animal bites, pediatric and adult injury patterns, and animal bite assessment guidelines and treatment strategies.

• Identify types and causes of animal bites
• Predict adult and pediatric injury patterns from animal bites
• Explain animal bite assessment guidelines, treatment strategies, and complications

Assessment and Management of V-Tach with Pulses (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Ventricular tachycardia is a very serious, often fatal dysrhythmia that can occur with or without pulses. Each year over 300,000 patients die from ventricular tachycardia; this is nearly one half of all cardiac related deaths. Untreated, even pulsed ventricular tachycardia can quickly deteriorate into ventricular fibrillation. In this course learn to distinguish between and treat stable and unstable ventricular tachycardia.

• Discuss the causes of ventricular tachycardia with pulses
• Review the methods to assess ventricular tachycardia
• Provide judgment criteria to distinguish between stable and unstable ventricular tachycardia
• Explain the treatment of both stable and unstable ventricular tachycardia.

Assessment and Treatment of Ankle Injuries (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The ankle is critical for movement. Each step puts 1.5 times our body weight of pressure on your ankle. Ankle injuries from trips and falls account for over 14.2 million annual physician visits, but only 15% of these injuries are fractures. In this course review ankle and foot anatomy, explore mechanisms of injury, learn to perform a thorough ankle examination and apply appropriate treatments.

• Discuss the anatomy and function of the ankle joint and the foot*
• Review the kinematics and mechanisms of injury for the ankle*
• Learn to perform a thorough examination of the ankle*
• Apply appropriate treatments for an injured ankle

Assessment and Treatment of Submersion Injuries (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Emergency responders are called to assist with dangerous water rescue situations, such as a child that has fallen through the ice. But most submersion injuries occur a short distance from safety, in places like a bathtub or home swimming pool. This presentation focuses on the submersion injuries of drowning and near drowning. In this course learn causes, extrication considerations, and assessment and treatment of submersion injuries.

• Discuss submersion injury statistics
• Explain causes of submersion injuries
• Understand submersion injury patterns
• Explore rescue and extrication considerations for submersion injury patients
• Describe assessment and treatment of a submersion injury patient

Assessment Challenges in Geriatric Patients (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

More than 12% of the US population is over age 65 and that number is expected to rise to 25% by the year 2050. Many seniors live with at least one chronic medical condition. In this course you will review the factors that complicate geriatric patient assessment and techniques to conduct efficient geriatric patient interviews.

• Review the demographics of the geriatric population.
• Identify physical factors that complicate the assessment of a geriatric patient
• Identify psychosocial and emotional issues that may complicate the assessment of a geriatric patient
• Employ tools to conduct efficient interview of geriatric patients

Assessment, Treatment and Transport of Morbidly Obese Patients (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Sixty-four percent of Americans are overweight or obese. One in 80 men weighs more than 300 pounds and one in 200 women weighs more than 300 pounds. Obesity the second leading cause of preventable death kills more than 300,000 Americans per year. This presentation defines overweight, obesity, and morbid obesity and strategies to assess, treat, and transport these patients with respect while maintaining the standard of care and protecting prehospital personnel.

• Define overweight, obese, and morbidly obese*
• Explore the health consequences of obesity and morbid obesity*
• Understand assessment challenges and treatment strategies for obese and morbidly obese patients*
• Explain lifting, moving, and extrication complications for obese and morbidly obese patients

Asthma Part 1: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Assessment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by increased reactivity of the airway to a stimulus. Review asthma epidemiology, anatomy, and pathophysiology. Learn to identify the causes of asthma and to assess its signs and symptoms of asthma.

• Identify the epidemiology, anatomy, and pathophysiology associated with asthma
• Explore assessment findings associated with asthma attacks

Asthma Part 2: Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by increased reactivity of the airway to a stimulus. This course discusses effective prehospital treatments for management of acute asthma attacks. It concludes with information on prevention of asthma attacks.

• Discuss ALS and BLS treatment strategies for asthma attacks

Asystole and PEA: Treating the Non-Shockable Rhythms (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Asystole and Pulseless Electrical Activity (PEA) are considered the non-shockable cardiac arrest rhythms and defibrillation is not indicated. This course reviews the causes (6Hs and 6Ts) of asystole and PEA, assessment, and treatment. The course concludes with tips for talking to a deceased patient’s family.

• List situations when no possibility of life exists and a resuscitation attempt is unnecessary
• Explain likely causes of asystole and pulseless electrical activity
• Describe assessment of asystole and pulseless electrical activity
• Describe treatments for asystole and pulseless electrical activity
• Describe the criteria for terminating resuscitative efforts and tips for talking to the patient’s family

Automatic Transport Ventilators in EMS (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

The decision on when to provide supplemental oxygen or to ventilate a patient is an important decision to make in EMS. The automatic transport ventilator, when used properly can provide controlled ventilations to the respiratory arrest patient. This course discusses the automatic transport ventilator applications and the common procedure for using. The course also discusses special considerations for use of an automatic transport ventilator.

• Indications and contraindications for using an Automatic Transport Ventilator in EMS.
• Common procedure for use of an Automatic Transport Ventilator by EMS providers.
• Knowing special considerations for use of an Automatic Transport Ventilator by EMS providers.

Avalanche: Rescue, Injury and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Most years, in the United States, avalanches kill more people than hurricanes. Utah has 10,000 avalanches each winter that bury an average of twenty people. More than any other natural hazard, avalanches are responsible for an average of four deaths per year in Utah. The course author writes, "It is my goal to share some basic information about how avalanches happen, avalanche injury patterns, basic rescue principles and patient assessment and treatment priorities for single or multiple patients." Even if you don't live in an avalanche pathway, you will learn some interesting concepts to care for patients that suffer from cold exposure, debris burial, blunt chest trauma, and asphyxiation.


• Understand how an avalanche occurs.
• Identify avalanche injury patterns.
• Review basic avalanche rescue principles for rapid location and extrication
• Explain assessment and treatment priorities for single or multiple patients

Avian Influenza (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Although avian influenza has not been reported as responsible for any deaths in the United States yet, it will. When a former Secretary of Health and Human Services resigned in 2004, he cited the avian flu as the item that worried him most. This course defines avian influenza, transmission, and EMS pandemic preparation.

• Define avian influenza
• Discuss transmission of avian influenza
• Describe what EMS providers can do to be prepared

Basic 12-Lead EKG Operation and Interpretation (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Every EMT can learn to attach a patient to a 12-lead EKG. 12-Leads are non-invasive and there is little risk to the patient as long as immediate life threat care is not delayed while waiting for the 12-lead or the interpretation. In this course you will review acute coronary syndrome causes, learn to acquire a 12 lead EKG, and understand basic interpretation techniques.

• Understand relevant anatomical features of the heart.
• Discuss the problems leading to acute coronary syndromes, or ACS
• Learn how to efficiently and effectively acquire a 12 lead EKG
• Trouble shoot EKG acquisition problems.
• Introduce interpretation and treatment techniques

Basic Airway Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

A leading cause of preventable prehospital death is a failure to adequately control the patient’s airway. Regardless of your experience or level of training, it is important to maintain excellent basic life support skills for airway assessment and management. In this course, we review airway anatomy and physiology, and basic airway management techniques.

• Describe airway structures and function
• List important differences in pediatric airway anatomy
• Explore basic airway management techniques
• Describe delivery of ventilations and supplemental oxygen

Bloodborne Pathogens

1 hr
4 5

Personal safety is always the EMS provider’s first priority. Because of bloodborne pathogens every patient contact is a threat to EMS provider safety. This course reviews the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard, bloodborne pathogens encountered by EMS providers, use of personal protective equipment, and reporting an exposure incident.

• Define bloodborne pathogen and pertinent elements of the OSHA standard
• Discuss common bloodborne pathogens encountered by EMS providers
• Review the value of the Hepatitis B Vaccination for EMS providers
• Discuss the methods, value, and limitations of personal protective equipment or PPE to prevent or reduce exposure to bloodborne pathogens
• Describe components of an exposure control plan and action steps if exposed to a bloodborne pathogen

Burn Injury Assessment and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

A patient with major burns induces anxiety in many EMS providers. It is difficult to assess the extent of the injuries, since many times the internal respiratory damage can be more severe than the external burns. Prehospital providers are expected to estimate the depth and severity of burns while providing emergency medical care. In this course, review relevant anatomy, how to estimate the extent and severity of injury and assessment, and management principles for burn injuries.

• Define the basic anatomy of the skin and mechanism of injury, pathophysiology, and classifications of burns
• Estimate the extent of burn injuries using Jackson’s Thermal Wound Theory, the Rule of Nines, and the Palmer Method
• Describe the assessment and management of thermal burn injuries

Calcium Channel Blocker Overdose (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Calcium channel blockers are prescribed to millions of patients to treat angina, hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and to prevent migraine headaches. Unfortunately, calcium channel blocker overdose is rapidly becoming the most lethal prescription medication ingestion in the United States. In this course learn the effects of calcium channel blockers, overdose symptoms, and assessment and treatment of calcium channel blocker overdose

• Explain the effects and uses of calcium channel blocker medications
• Discuss calcium channel blocker overdose signs and symptoms
• Review assessment components for a suspected calcium channel blocker overdose
• Describe treatment for calcium channel blocker overdose

Child Abuse: EMS Roles & Responsibilities (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In this course the role of EMS professional related to assessing, suspecting, and reporting child abuse is reviewed. The course explains several types of abuse and neglect and discusses general principles for treatment and assessment. The course concludes with a short discussion of prevention programs. Since the course focuses on general principles it is important to know and understand specific state or local guidelines applicable to your practice as an EMT or paramedic.

• Describe EMS professionals role related to possible child abuse
• Explain types of abuse and abuse syndromes
• Discuss assessment and management of the pediatric patient who has been abused
• Examine proactive prevention programs

Clinical Decision Making (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In the field EMS providers gather information to formulate a field impression and working diagnosis. Each step of the process is a decision making opportunity. This course explores critical thinking and the clinical decision making process.

• Identify factors that influence medical care in the pre-hospital environment
• Define the components, stages and sequences of the critical thinking process
• Describe factors that have positive and negative effects on decision making
• Summarize the “six Rs” of effective clinical decision making
• Explore several situations that require clinical decision making.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Complementary and alternative medicine is a collection of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are used by millions of Americans to treat or lessen disease. This presentation explores common CAM treatments, their impact on EMS, and the adverse effects of some CAM treatments and supplements.


• To Define complimentary and alternative medicine*
• To Describe common CAM treatments*
• To Understand impact of CAM on EMS*
• To Assess and document CAM use*
• To Explore the risks and adverse effects of some CAM treatments and supplements

C-Spine Injuries in Athletics Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

A 1995 survey reported that 39% of high school varsity football players sustained injuries. Of those injuries only 39% occurred during competition. 93% of football injuries were “new” or first time injuries. Due to advances in athletic equipment and rule changes there has been a 3% decline in serious injuries since the 1995 survey. Spinal cord injuries do still occur however, often leading to serious injuries, so emergency responders need to have a good base of knowledge in the proper management of c-spine injuries.

• Review C-spine anatomy
• Discuss mechanisms of C-spine injury
• Review signs and symptoms of c-spine injury
• Explore guidelines for injury evaluation and treatment, including life threats

C-Spine Injuries in Athletics Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In 2001 guidelines from an inter-association task force of professional organizations representing emergency medical services, sports medicine, and physicians were released. The guidelines outlined standardized procedures for proper handling of athletes with C-spine injuries in the pre-hospital setting. This course explores the task force recommendations for equipment removal, patient movement, and patient packaging.

• Explore recommendations for treatment and transport of the spine injured athlete
• Describe tools and techniques for helmet facemask removal
• Discuss proper technique for equipment removal and preparation for transport.

Cyanide Poisoning (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Cyanide exists in many products, and the incomplete combustion of certain items such as wood, paper, plastic, and synthetics make it a very real, potential hazard to those who fight fires. All emergency responders should recognize safety hazards and minimize the risks associated with cyanide poisoning. With this course, learn to identify the signs and symptoms of cyanide exposure, as well as antidote and supportive treatments.

• Overview the chemical cyanide and its various uses
• Review how cyanide enters the body and the body systems affected
• Identify specific signs and symptoms of cyanide exposure or poisoning
• Discuss assessment and treatment strategies that are available to pre-hospital providers.

Death and Dying (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Little time is spent on discussing and studying death and its effect on the EMS provider, the patient, the patient’s family, and others intimately concerned with a particular death. This course explores topics associated with death including, Do Not Resuscitate orders, when not to transport or treat, and the psychological effects of death on the survivors including healthcare providers.

• Introduce pathophysiology of death and how to determine that death has occurred
• Explore general reaction of survivors and patient to death and dying process
• Define comfort measures EMS providers should consider providing
• Explore considerations for termination of care, applying a DNR order, and not transporting a patient

Defibrillation (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Roughly, 300,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest in the prehospital environment every year. EMS personnel begin resuscitation attempts on about 60% of those patients. For patients presenting with ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia, early defibrillation added to a foundation of high quality CPR provides the best opportunity for survival This course will focus on the science of defibrillation, how defibrillators function, prehospital AED usage, and how to handle special situations.

• Give some historical perspective on defibrillation
• Discuss the chain of survival and how defibrillation fits
• Cover the science of electrical therapy
• Discuss automated external defibrillators
• Explore some safety considerations and special situations

Demystifying the Central Line (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Do you know the potential benefits and complications of accessing a central line? This course is intended to give the pre-hospital provider a basic understanding of the various types of central lines. Patients, at home with a central line, are increasingly being encountered by pre-hospital providers. In this course learn to recognize types of central lines and methods to access central lines.


• Explain the various reasons patients have a central line and discuss where they are placed
• Recognize the features of different types of central lines
• Explain complications of insertion and use of central lines
• Explain the methods to access central lines

Depression (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Depression takes many forms; some are life threatening. Depression, which is one of the most common mental health disorders, affects over 19 million adults each year in the United States This course explores causes and symptoms of depression as well as assessment and treatment principles for emergency response personnel.

• Define depression
• Discuss the causes and symptoms of depression
• Explore the major types of depression
• Review assessment and treatment principles
• Discuss prevention techniques for emergency response personnel

Diabetic Emergencies Part 1: Causes and Types (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Diabetic emergencies are among the most common reasons that EMS is called. More than a million new cases are diagnosed every year. In this course learn the causes, risk factors, and types of diabetes. Also learn to distinguish hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia.

• Describe the normal relationship between insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels in the blood
• Discuss the pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus
• Explore types of diabetic emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies Part 2: Assessment and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Diabetic emergencies are among the most common reasons that EMS is called. Today, more than ever, EMS providers are well equipped to assess and treat diabetic emergencies. Use the assessment and treatment guidelines in this course to review and reinforce your knowledge about diabetic emergencies.

• Review the clinical significance of assessment findings for a patient with a diabetic emergency
• Introduce treatment options for diabetic emergencies

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

DKA is a complication of uncontrolled diabetes that is most commonly experienced by type 1 – or insulin dependent diabetics – with mortality rate as high as 10%. In this course learn the pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, assessment strategies, and treatment options for a patient with DKA.

• Describe the pathophysiology of diabetic ketoacidosis and how it differs from normal blood sugar metabolism
• Discuss the signs and symptoms of DKA
• Review assessment strategies for a patient with DKA
• Explore treatment options for a patient with DKA

Disease Conditions of Chronic Alcoholism (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Abuse of alcohol and its related problems is pervasive in EMS patients. Alcohol consumption causes immediate illness and injury, but it also has a cumulative negative health impact. In many EMS calls, alcohol is the likely cause or a relevant contributor to our patient’s problems. In this continuing education module, we will first seek to understand alcoholism and then explore the disease conditions of chronic alcoholism.

• To define and understand alcohol abuse and dependence and its impacts on individuals and society
• To describe the pathophysiology of alcohol absorption, toxicity, and elimination
• To identify signs and symptoms of disease conditions of chronic alcoholic patients
• To treat disease conditions of chronic alcoholic patients

Diver Down: SCUBA Injury and Illness (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

In this video training program paramedic, SCUBA instructor, and rescue diver Michael Fraley teaches the important gas laws that impact SCUBA divers. He also reviews signs and symptoms of SCUBA related medical emergencies that EMS may encounter. The video concludes with a series of cases and thorough discussion with attendees of the live presentation.

• Understand how gas laws impact a SCUBA diver under normal diving conditions and during an emergency.
• Review the signs and symptoms of SCUBA related medical emergencies that EMS may encounter.
• Explain the prehospital management of some of the more serious SCUBA related medical emergencies.

Ecstasy Abuse Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Ecstasy belongs to a group of drugs called designer drugs, which are manufactured by taking existing therapeutic medications and chemically altering them to create new drugs with different effects. Use of ecstasy is growing in all demographic groups. In this course learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of ecstasy use and treat a patient suffering from the effects of ecstasy use.

• Discuss the history, common names, and pharmacology of ecstasy administration
• Recognize the signs and symptoms related to ecstasy abuse
• Develop a treatment plan for patients suffering from the effects of using ecstasy

Electrical Hazards

1 hr
4 5

Electrical injuries including electrical burns and electrical shock can occur in the home or workplace. Special considerations need to be made for emergency response personnel when responding to the scene of an electrical injury. In this course learn how to keep safe as well as caring for the patients you may encounter.

• Describe injuries that may result from contact with electricity*
• Define electrical hazards that may be encountered*
• Discuss methods of protection from electrical hazards*
• Review general treatment principles for electrical injuries

Emergency Care for Lightning Strike Victims (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The lifetime chance of being struck by lightning is 1 in 3000. Lightning is the second leading cause of weather related fatalities. Explore how lightning strikes, where it strikes, and the effect it has in the body. We will challenge several lightning myths that delay critical patient care, define types of injuries, and explore tactics to increase rescuer safety.


• To describe how lightning can strike a person and cause injuries.
• To dispel lightning myths that may effect patient care or put rescuers at risk.
• To list types of mild, moderate, and severe injuries from a lightning strike.

Emergency Childbirth (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The back of an ambulance is not the ideal place to have a baby, but in most cases, it proceeds normally. Frequently reviewing childbirth techniques may prevent a happy event from becoming a disaster. This module focuses on the care of the obstetrical patient before, during, and after childbirth, along with care of the newborn and some abnormal delivery emergencies.

• Review relevant anatomy and physiology
• Discuss assessment and care for the obstetric patient with impending delivery
• Explain assessment and care to the newborn infant.
• Review care to the mother immediately following the delivery of a newborn.

Emergency Responder Rehabilitation (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Rehab is a place, an action, and an outcome. The goal of emergency operations rehab is to minimize stress and heat related illness and death with medical monitoring, rapid response, as well as rest, food, and fluid interventions. In this course, learn about need for medical monitoring and rehab, common injuries during emergency incidents and training events, rehab practices, and key components of a rehab protocol.

• Understand the need for medical monitoring and rehabilitation during emergency operations and training exercises
• Identify common injuries and their causes during emergency operations
• Assess emergency responders for illness or injury in the rehab area
• Treat emergency responders in the rehab area
• Discuss key components of a protocol for EMS support of emergency operations

Emergency Treatment of V-Fib and Pulseless V-Tach (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Every year about a half-million people die of sudden cardiac death before they reach the hospital. Ventricular tachycardia is likely the initial cardiac arrest rhythm; ventricular fibrillation is found nearly 70% of the time by EMS providers. In this course learn to understand the causes, assessment, and treatment of pulseless ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation.

• Describe the causes of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation
• Identify the physiology of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation
• Review the assessment of ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation
• Explain the treatment of pulseless ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation

EMS Airway Management Advanced

2 hrs
4 5

Description: Every patient must have a patent airway to survive. When the airway is obstructed, the EMT must clear it as soon as possible using the methods described in this lesson. The only exceptions to this would be situations where it is unsafe or the airway problem is such that it cannot be treated in the field and the patient must be transported immediately to a hospital. Remember - a patient without an airway is a dead patient.

Course Duration: 2 hours

Audience: EMT-Intermediate and Paramedic

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Allergies and Anaphylaxis Basic

1 hr
4 5

Description: Allergic disorders affect more than 20 percent of adults and children (40 to 50 million people) and are the sixth leading cause of chronic illness in the United States, according to the Allergy Report from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAI). Severe allergic reactions, known as anaphylaxis, are life-threatening emergencies. The ability to recognize and manage a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) is possibly the only thing standing between a patient and imminent death.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMT-Basic

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Blind Nasotracheal Intubation Advanced

1 hr
4 5

Description: Blind nasotracheal intubation offers responders the ability to maintain a patent airway when the oral tracheal route is contraindicated. Despite its critical role in the field, however, performing successful blind nasotracheal intubation can be a challenge because it does not permit the responder to view the glottic opening. Training and increased familiarity with the procedure can help EMS providers overcome these challenges. This course reviews the concept and procedure of blind nasotracheal intubation, including a discussion of indications and contraindications, intubation procedures, and methods of confirming successful tube placement.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: ALS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge required

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Burn Management Advanced

2 hrs
4 5

Description: Burn injuries are a form of trauma that can be very distracting to the EMS provider because of the look and smell of the burn. These injuries have high mortality rates and can result in lengthy rehabilitation, cosmetic disfigurement, psychosocial problems,and permanent physical disabilities for the patient. When providing emergency care for these types of injuries, focus on the treatment of life-threatening injuries if they are present even though the burn may consume attention. This course highlights the different types of burn injuries and how to treat them to prevent further injury and reduce contamination.

Course Duration: 2 hours

Audience: ALS personnel (AEMTs and Paramedics)

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Cardiac Emergencies Advanced

1 hr
4 5

Description: More than 600,000 patients die each year from cardiovascular diseases. Half of these deaths occur before the patient reaches the hospital. Many times, collapse and sudden death is the first sign of cardiac disease. Research has shown that rapid defibrillation is the major determinant of survival in cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation. Not all chest pain, however, will result in cardiac arrest. This course highlights the signs and symptoms and the emergency medical care of patients experiencing chest pain related to conditions such as angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, heart failure, cardiac tamponade, hypertensive emergency, and cardiogenic shock.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS CNS Injuries Advanced

1 hr
4 5

Description: Every year, brain, skull, and spinal cord injuries contribute to numerous patient fatalities at accident scenes. In the United States, approximately 12,000 patients survive their spinal cord injuries, many of whom will suffer severe, debilitating effects that can last throughout their lives. The costs of these injuries to patients can be significant. It is estimated that a patient who was 25 years old at the time of injury, in addition to suffering possible job loss, may also incur more than $4.6 million in expenses over the course of their lifetime. EMS providers play a critical role in assessing injuries to the central nervous system (CNS) and minimizing the chance of further injury by providing effective spinal-motion restriction. Errors can be devastating. It has been estimated that up to one-quarter of spinal cord injuries may be made significantly worse during extrication or early treatment after a motor vehicle accident. This course provides an overview of the anatomy of the spine and CNS and highlights the signs of spinal injury, assessment and medical care of patients with CNS injuries, and the use of short and long backboards. It has recently been updated to include the latest education standards for EMS personnel.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: ALS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS CNS Injuries Basic

1 hr
4 5

Description: Head and spinal trauma can result in severe, debilitating injuries. These kinds of injuries can have a significant effect on a person's lifestyle and finances. Over the course of a lifetime, a patient aged 25 at the time of injury will incur over $4.6 million in expenses, as well as lost income due to job loss. By providing accurate injury assessment and adequate spinal motion restriction, EMS providers can prevent these patients' injuries from becoming worse. Packaging and transporting the patients quickly and safely can be a challenge. If the injury is not identified during assessment and the patient is not properly immobilized, permanent disability or even fatality can result. It has been estimated that up to one-quarter of spinal cord injuries may be made significantly worse during extrication or early treatment following a motor vehicle accident. This course provides an overview of the anatomy of the spine and central nervous system and highlights the signs of spinal injury, assessment and medical care of patients with CNS injuries, and the use of short and long backboards.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: BLS personnel

Prerequisites: EMR or EMT certification recommended

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Communication and Documentation

1 hr
4 5

Description: Communication is an essential component of prehospital care. Both verbal and written communication will be used during every response. Patient care includes assessment, treatment, and the ability to effectively and efficiently communicate findings to other health care providers. Communication occurs from the pre-dispatch phase, throughout the call, and well after the completion of the transport. Various individuals will be involved in the verbal communication process and vital information will be discussed. EMS providers must have excellent verbal and written communication skills to ensure accurate information is delivered to the appropriate individuals. The continuum of patient care is based upon effective and efficient communication skills.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: All EMS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Environmental Emergencies Basic

1 hr
4 5

Description: Environmental emergencies include exposure to both heat and cold. Regulation of body temperature, which is an important physiological function, can be impaired under temperature extremes and result in heat or cold related illness. The key to effective management is recognizing the signs and symptoms and providing prompt emergency medical care.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Head and Facial Injuries Advanced

1 hr
4 5

Description: The head and neck contain many structures critical to the airway, central nervous system, and sensation. Injuries to these areas can cause serious and permanent damage if improperly treated or missed in the patient assessment. This course reviews the pathophysiology and management of common injuries to the head, face, and neck, including injuries to the face, ears, eyes, and throat and soft tissue of the neck. Prompt identification and treatment of these injuries is crucial in reducing pain, preventing further injury, and minimizing permanent damage.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: ALS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS HIPAA Awareness

1 hr
3 5

Description: The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1996 and aims to protect patients' health information from being improperly used or disclosed. Since 2003, when enforcement of the Privacy Rule began, over 77,000 complaints have been received by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS). Nearly 20,000 of these were investigated, and the organizations that had violated HIPAA were required to make changes to their privacy practices, or take other corrective actions. Some were also forced to pay fines and penalties. This course reviews the federal HIPAA regulations and discusses the duties and responsibilities that are required of EMS personnel and agencies. It also explains the various rights that HIPAA provides to patients and the safeguards that are required when dealing with patient health information. By complying with HIPAA, you will protect patients' confidentiality and ensure that any use or disclosure of their information protects you and your organization from legal liability.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS Personnel (all levels)

Prerequisites: None

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Infectious Disease Control

1 hr
4 5

Description: Over 1,000 healthcare personnel are injured by contaminated needles and other sharps devices per day in the U.S., according to CDC estimates. These kinds of injuries pose a serious risk because contaminated needles and sharps can transmit bloodborne pathogens such as HIV and Hepatitis B and C. Besides these, over 20 other communicable pathogens can be found in blood and other potentially infectious material encountered at the emergency scene. To prevent infection, EMS providers need to minimize their exposure by following Standard Precautions and using Personal Protective Equipment to create a barrier of protection. These and other protection strategies are outlined in the Occupational Health & Safety Administration's Bloodborne Pathogen Standard (BPS).

This course provides an overview of the risks and realities of infectious disease exposure incidents in the prehospital environment. It also reviews the requirements for complying with the BPS and provides practical information on various diseases and protection strategies for EMS providers.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS providers

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: OSHA 29 CFR 1910.1030

EMS Medical, Ethical, and Legal Issues

1 hr
4 5

Description: There are a variety of ethical and legal issues you will encounter on the job. Awareness of these issues is the first step in protecting yourself from both civil and criminal actions. One of your guiding principles as a provider of emergency medical care is to do no further harm. If you follow this principle, act in good faith, and according to appropriate standards of care, you should avoid legal exposure. This course provides an overview of the key legal and ethical issues you will encounter on the job, including scope of practice, standards of care, negligence, consent, and documentation. Because each state is different and protocols vary from county to county, seek competent legal advice if you have any questions regarding these issues.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS personnel

Prerequisites: None

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Neonatology Advanced

2 hrs
4 5

Description: Neonatology is the study and care of the newborn, or neonate, patient. After a woman gives birth, you must care for two patients-the mother and her newborn child. The newborn has several special needs, the most important of which are protection of the airway and support of ventilations. This course reviews the techniques for assessing the newborn patient, the proper care of a distressed newborn, and the field management of complications common at birth.

Course Duration: 2 hours

Audience: ALS personnel

Prerequisites: AEMT or Paramedic certification recommended.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Obstetrical Emergencies Basic

1 hr
3 5

Description: Gynecology is the branch of medicine that focuses on the female reproductive system. Obstetrics is the branch of medicine that deals specifically with the care of women during pregnancy. Although gynecological and obstetrical emergencies are not the most common types of emergencies you will encounter, when you are called to one, it will require fast, effective, and professional care. Childbirth usually occurs in the hospital setting, but you may have to assist with the delivery of an infant in the prehospital setting. You may also encounter pregnancy-related emergencies, both major and minor. During your initial assessment, an expectant mother's condition can appear to be minor, but in mere seconds it can turn life-threatening. Therefore, understanding the anatomy and physiology of the female reproduction system and the body's changes during pregnancy will help you best care for a patient.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMT-B

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Operating an AED

1 hr
4 5

Description: More than 600,000 patients die each year from cardiovascular diseases. Half of these deaths occur before the patient reaches the hospital. Many times, collapse and sudden death is the first sign of cardiac disease. Research has shown that rapid defibrillation is the major determinant of survival in cardiac arrest caused by ventricular fibrillation. This course highlights the signs and symptoms of cardiac compromise, the steps to take to use an automated external defibrillator (AED) properly, special considerations and precautions involving the use of an AED.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS Personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Patient Assessment Advanced

1 hr
4 5

Description: Patient assessment is a structured method of evaluating a patient's condition. An organized and well-developed patient assessment serves as a valuable tool for the provision of patient care. Patient assessment is the process of looking for, asking about, and recognizing the symptoms and signs of an abnormal condition. Because a patient's condition can change quickly, the assessment process continues throughout the time spent with a patient.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: ALS personnel

Prerequisites: AEMT or Paramedic certification recommended.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Advanced

2 hrs
4 5

Description: Pediatric cardiac arrest is one of the most serious and stressful incidents EMS providers face. Care for victims of cardiac arrest must be provided immediately because their window of survival is very limited. During cardiac arrest, the pumping action of the heart stops, and the body's cells begin to die within 4-6 minutes of onset. Bystanders trained in CPR and EMS providers must act quickly to improve a patient's chances of survival from cardiac arrest. Approximately 16,000 children go into cardiac arrest each year. More than 5,000 children experience a nontraumatic pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) each year.

Course Duration: 2 hours

Audience: EMS personnel (ALS)

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge required

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Pediatric Emergencies Advanced

2 hrs
4 5

Description: Pediatric patients can cause anxiety for the prehospital care provider due to lack of experience dealing with this special population as well as a fear of failure. Infants and children are not just small adults. Their body size, differing developmental changes, and differing ranges of vital signs require that the EMS provider modify his approach accordingly. This course will cover the key differences in pediatric patients and common emergencies EMS providers may face with this patient population.

Course Duration: 2 hours

Audience: EMS personnel

Prerequisites: No prior knowledge is required.

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Pharmacology Basic

1 hr
4 5

Description: Giving the proper medication in an emergency situation is critical to the well-being of the patient. As a prehospital care provider, you carry several medications that you may give a patient under specific conditions. In addition, you can assist a patient in self-administering certain prescribed medications with the approval of your medical director. This is a responsibility that must not be taken lightly. While administering the proper medications can improve a patient's well-being, there are risks. Medications used inappropriately can cause harm or even death to the patient. The goal of this course is to give you a basic understanding of pharmacology and introduce you to the medications you will encounter in the field.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: BLS personnel

Prerequisites: EMR or EMT certification recommended

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Respiratory System A and P Review

1 hr
4 5

Description: The process of breathing and respiration is a primary bodily function required to sustain life. A thorough understanding of the anatomical and physiological function of the structures of the respiratory system will assist EMS personnel in providing adequate medical care to those in need. This course will describe the basic components and functions of the respiratory system and how to differentiate between adequate and inadequate respiration.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS Personnel (all levels)

Prerequisites: None

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Response to Mass Casualty Incidents (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

This course explores the ins and outs of EMS response to a mass casualty incident. Explore how EMS personnel can assess and transport a large number of patients by implementing incident command and using a triage system.

• Discuss EMS roles in MCI response
• Explain Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment
• Explore MCI treatment and transport considerations
• Practice triage and MCI response skills

EMS Thoracic Emergencies Advanced

1 hr
3 5

Description: The thorax, or chest, is the part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs. Because the chest contains these vital organs, almost all chest traumas can be life threatening! Understanding the mechanism of injury and relevant signs and symptoms of thoracic injuries is of paramount importance when dealing with the traumatized patient. This course highlights the signs, symptoms, and emergency care of the most common traumatic injuries to the thorax.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: ALS personnel

Prerequisites: AEMT or Paramedic certification recommended

Regulatory Reference: None

EMS Workplace Stress

1 hr
4 5

Stress is a physical and psychological reaction to the increasing demands of life. When your brain perceives a threat, it signals your body to release a burst of hormones to fuel your response. This is called the "fight-or-flight" response. Once the threat is gone, your body should return to a relaxed state. However, the nonstop stress of modern life means your alarm system rarely shuts off. As an emergency medical care provider, you face a variety of stressful situations in the workplace, such as inconsiderate coworkers, abuse calls, dying kids, forced overtime and much more. In addition, you must deal compassionately with patients and victims who are experiencing stress. Stress is one of the leading causes of reduced productivity in the workplace. And stress-related illnesses lead to absenteeism. EMS employers need to be aware of the impact of stress on their providers so they can help employees manage their stress and minimize the impact of stress on the agency.

This course highlights some typical sources of stress, as well as methods of dealing with and reducing stress in your daily life. It is impossible to completely avoid stress, so learning to deal with it is necessary to your health and well-being.

This training course has 9 learning modules with a 10-question exam.

Course Duration: 1 hour

Audience: EMS personnel

Epilepsy and Seizure Response for EMS

1.5 hrs
4 5

The EMS training describes a variety of seizures associated with epilepsy, seizures with other potential causes, appropriate EMS response on scene, and issues to be considered when determining whether or not further medical care is warranted.

Ergonomics

1 hr
4 5

In this course, we will define ergonomics and musculoskeletal disorders, and we will examine the potential for ergonomic hazards in our equipment, environment and work practices. Also, we will introduce methods of prevention including lifting techniques and physical fitness, in order to avoid injury.

• Describe injuries that may result from poor ergonomic injuries
• Define potential ergonomic hazards
• Discuss methods of prevention

Ethics for the EMS Provider (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

The most difficult, challenging, and frustrating EMS calls usually involve an ethical dilemma, like refusal of treatment; do not resuscitate orders, or compromised patient confidentiality. This program reviews key ethics terms and concepts, common EMS ethical dilemmas and a rapid process to resolve them.

• Review ethics terminology
• Describe personal and professional codes of ethics
• Describe ethical dilemmas and steps that can be used to solve them
• Discuss ethical issues that face EMS providers

Eye Protection

1 hr
4 5

Eye injuries in the workplace are very common. However, by knowing the risks and using protective gear, more than ninety percent of all eye injuries can be prevented. In this course review eye anatomy, discuss common eye injuries, and review types of eye protection.

• Review eye anatomy
• Discuss common causes, hazards and injuries to the eye
• Overview types of eye protection
• Review eye safety techniques
• Discuss general assessment, treatment and prevention principles for eye injuries

Fetal Trauma from Motor Vehicle Collisions (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Motor vehicle collisions are the leading cause of maternal and fetal injury during pregnancy. This presentation reviews pregnancy anatomy and physiology, describes fetal injuries from trauma, and the importance of assessing and stabilizing mom first.


• To review pregnancy anatomy and physiology
• To describe fetal trauma injuries
• To assess and treat maternal trauma
• To learn components of fetal assessment
• To review strategies to prevent fetal trauma from motor vehicle collisions

Fire Extinguishers: Extinguish or Evacuate?

1 hr
4 5

In this course, we will review the steps to take when a fire is discovered, how to use a fire extinguisher and the limits of portable fire extinguishers. All employees, with employer provided training should be able to select a portable fire extinguisher, handle a fire extinguisher with the PASS technique, and use the RACE acronym to appropriately respond to a small fire in the incipient phase. Note, this course is not intended for firefighters with training at or above Firefighter I.

• Discuss reasons for fire extinguisher training
• Define the fire tetrahedron, classes of fires, and types of fire extinguishers *
• Review steps to take to use a fire extinguisher when a fire is discovered
• Describe limits of portable fire extinguishers

Foodborne Illness (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

How do we differentiate a common stomach ache from food borne illness? Food borne illness in the United States is probably more prevalent than you think. The CDC reports 76 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and over 5,000 deaths are from food borne illness each year. This course explores common agents, causes, and symptoms of food borne illness.

• Define food borne illness
• Discuss the causes and symptoms of food borne illness
• Explore the various food borne illness agents
• Review prevention, assessment and treatment of food borne illness

General Science (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The study of the human body cannot be accomplished without a discussion of the most basic level of organization, that of individual atoms and molecules. The characteristics of everything in the universe are determined by atoms and the way they interact with each other. This course will help you to understand the general science needed to begin study of human anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology.

• Discuss matter, states of matter, atoms, and elements and the different ways they combine to form molecules and compounds
• Define chemical reaction and distinguish between the two major types important for studying physiology
• Describe factors that affect chemical reaction rates

Hearing Protection

1 hr
4 5

Hearing loss as a result of noise exposure is the second most self reported occupational injury in the United States. What noises do you encounter in your job that could cause permanent and irreversible hearing damage? After reviewing ear anatomy and hearing protection standards this course introduces types of hearing protection.

• Review ear anatomy
• Explore hearing protection standards and regulations
• Discuss common causes, hazards, and injuries to the ear
• Overview types of hearing protection
• Review practices for preventing ear injuries and hearing loss

Heart Failure (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Congestive heart failure or heart failure is one of the fastest growing diseases in the United States. The incidence of heart failure is expected to double over the next 40 years. Heart failure is not a single problem, nor is it usually an acute event. It is a problem that progresses and often presents to EMS in its worst stages. This course breaks down the physiology of heart failure and identifies current emergency treatment trends.

• Identify the incidence and frequency of heart failure
• Explain the pathophysiology of heart failure
• Differentiate left versus right side heart failure
• Discuss current prehospital treatments in heart failure management

Hip Fracture Assessment and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Most hip fractures happen to elderly patients in their homes, and it is unlikely they can self-transport to the emergency department. Instead, they summon EMS. Falls are the leading cause of injury related deaths in elderly patients. In this course we review hip anatomy and physiology, in addition to causes of hip fractures, injury assessment, and treatment of a hip fracture.

• Review hip anatomy and physiology
• Explore causes of a hip fracture
• Discuss assessment of a hip fracture
• Explain hip fracture treatments
• Encourage EMS participation in elderly fall prevention programs

HIV/AIDS Part 1

1 hr
4 5

In 25 years, AIDS has killed more than 25 million people around the world. 500,000 Americans have died as a result of AIDS. Approximately 40,000 Americans are infected with HIV every year. This course reviews HIV/AIDS transmission, clinical management, and consequences of infection.


• Define AIDS and HIV
• Discuss the scope of the disease
• Review HIV/AIDS transmission
• Discuss clinical management
• Discuss consequences of being infected with HIV/AIDS

HIV/AIDS Part 2

1 hr
4 5

Emergency response personnel regularly assess and treat patients with HIV/AIDS. If you have a bloodborne pathogens exposure, accurate and reliable testing methods are available. Emergency response personnel who test positive for HIV/AIDS have rights for additional testing, treatment, and counseling.

• Discuss emergency response personnel exposure to HIV/AIDS
• Review the rights of emergency response personnel
• Overview typical calls emergency response personnel respond to with HIV/AIDS patients

Hypothermia: Assessment and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Hypothermia is not just an “up north—cold and snow” problem. Hypothermia can onset quickly from recreational exposure, trauma or can gradually worsen due to illness. Learn assessment guidelines to differentiate mild and severe hypothermia. Also the course reviews treatment guidelines for mild hypothermia and specific ALS and BLS considerations for severe hypothermia.

• To explain the causes of hypothermia and the patients most at risk *
• To describe signs and symptoms of mild, moderate, and severe hypothermia *
• To assess and treat hypothermia based on current research and guidelines *

Inducing Hypothermia Following Cardiac Arrest (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Other areas of CPR, such as compressions, have changed to improve cardiac resuscitation. Now researchers and practitioners are focusing on improving the neurological outcome of survivors. Induced hypothermia is a dynamic area of prehospital care. Ongoing research about induced hypothermia is encouraging and more EMS systems are considering induced hypothermia for cardiac arrest survivors. This course explores the mechanisms of action, risks, patient selection and cooling techniques for induced hypothermia.

• Describe the mechanisms of action for induced hypothermia
• Describe the risks and patient selection associated with induced hypothermia
• Review duration, cooling techniques, monitoring procedures and supportive care of induced hypothermia

Intraosseous Infusion (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Starting an intravenous line may be very difficult if not impossible in some situations. The use of intraosseous or IO access has become a standard in pediatric emergency care and is fast gaining popularity for adult emergency care. EMS providers can now choose between several I-O insertion devices. This course reviews the history of IO infusion, describes relevant anatomy and physiology, discusses the indications and contraindications of IO access and reviews the general insertion steps of any IO device.

• Review the history of pediatric and adult intraosseous infusions.
• Understand the anatomy and physiology of the vascular system as it relates to intraosseous infusions.
• Learn the indications, contraindications and complications of I-O therapy
• Review several I-O systems and their application to prehospital patient care

Introduction to Capnography (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Capnography is a measure of the overall ventilation status of the patient. It measures carbon dioxide production at the cellular level. In this course learn capnogram interpretation, abnormal patterns, and clinical applications for capnography.

• Define and describe capnography
• Describe the four phases of a capnogram
• Discuss abnormal capnogram patterns and abnormal capnometry values
• Discuss the clinical applications of capnography

Introduction to OSHA and General Safety Training

1 hr
4 5

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s goal is to reduce workplace injuries and deaths through safety and health standards. Much of what we do is impacted by OSHA standards or standards from comparable state workplace safety agencies. In this course learn OSHA history, the importance of following safety standards, and about the other safety and health courses available.

• Define OSHA
• Describe the importance of following safety standards
• Introduce workplace safety courses in CentreLearn’s OSHA series

Introduction to the Human Brain (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The brain is arguably the most powerful organ in the human body. It is responsible for controlling and coordinating voluntary and involuntary inactions. Because of these important roles, the brain can be thought of as the command center of the human body. In this course you will learn about brain anatomy, function of different parts, and how illness and injury affects the brain.

• Review the gross functional anatomy of the human brain
• Learn about the cells in the brain
• Learn about how cells in the brain communicate with one another
• Learn about how drugs, illness, and injury can alter brain function

Kinematics of Trauma (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Unintentional injury is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. Millions more are injured by traumatic injuries. To reduce death and disability, emergency responders must perform a proper trauma assessment. Learning kinematics of trauma will help emergency responders understand the likelihood of other injuries based on the patient’s mechanism of injury.

• Review the three mechanisms of injury
• Describe the three phases of events which contribute to traumatic injuries
• Describe the laws of energy and motion and their relationship to traumatic injuries

Lifting and Back Safety for EMS Providers

1 hr
4 5

In this course we explore lifting and back safety for EMS providers. Nearly every patient contact involves lifting and carrying which applies forces that can potentially injure your back. The course explores incidence of injuries, spinal column anatomy, back injury causes, lifting principles, and strength and flexibility exercises to prevent back injuries.

• Explore the incidence of lifting related back injury in EMS
• Review important spinal column anatomy
• Discuss the causes of back injury
• Explain techniques and principles for lifting
• Introduce strength and flexibility exercises to prevent back injuries

Low Back Pain (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Back pain is the most common cause of pain. In any given year 15-20% of Americans complain of low back pain. Nearly 100 million days of work are lost each year to back pain and $30-50 billion is spent annually on treating back injuries. In this course we explore spinal column anatomy, causes of low back pain, types of low back problems, and prehospital assessment and treatment for low back pain.

• Review important spinal column anatomy*
• Discuss the causes of low back pain*
• Explain prehospital assessment of low back pain*
• Provide prehospital treatment for low back pain

Management of Bradycardic Rhythms (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

This course covers general principles for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with bradycardic rhythms. After reviewing the bradycardic dysrhythmias treatments for underlying causes, as well as specific pharmacological treatments and transcutaneous pacing are discussed. Several cases are used to illustrate the general principles of assessment and treatment.

• Identify bradycardic dysrhythmias
• Compare and contrast stable and unstable rhythms
• Become familiar with pharmacologic and electrical interventions

Medical Staffing at Large Events (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

This course focuses on medical coverage for the Spirit of Racine Triathlon, a half-ironman race in SE Wisconsin. 1800 racers swim 1.2 miles, bike 56 miles, and run 13 miles on a hot and humid summer day. The event challenges, pre-planning, and communication principles are applicable to any event. The author shares his method to triage the racers most in need of on-scene medical treatment.

• Describe the challenges of providing medical coverage at a large sporting event
• Discuss pre-planning considerations for a large sporting event
• Explain communication principles for a large sporting event
• Discuss race day logistics
• Describe the medical staffing, triage, and treatment process

Methamphetamine Use & Hazards (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In this course explore the effects and use of methamphetamine and the unique scene safety hazard that clandestine drug labs pose to emergency responders and children. Methamphetamine is a highly addictive drug that has a severe impact on the central nervous system. Police officers, fire fighters, and EMTs are often the first on-scene to secure the area and begin emergency care of patients.


• Review the effects of methamphetamine use
• Identify the extent of methamphetamine use in the United States
• Discuss scene safety hazards of clandestine drug labs
• Explore assessment and treatment of meth users
• Explain special considerations for pediatric patients found at clandestine drug labs

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus - MRSA (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, often referred to as MRSA, is an infection that can be found at wound sites, skin openings, and in bodily fluids. Emergency response personnel will treat patients who are infected or carrying the bacteria and that exposure may lead to infection. This course will define MRSA, give an overview of causes and symptoms, and most importantly review prevention techniques to prevent the further spread of infection.

• Define MRSA
• Discuss the causes and symptoms of MRSA
• Discuss prevention techniques for emergency response personnel

Musculoskeletal Injuries Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

Musculoskeletal injuries are commonly encountered by EMS providers. This two part course first defines musculoskeletal injuries including the anatomy and physiology of bones and joints, as well as types of musculoskeletal injuries. In part 2, musculoskeletal assessment and treatment principles including splinting and pain management techniques are reviewed.

• Review anatomy and physiology of muscles, bones, and joints
• Describe types and causes of bone and joint injuries
• Review specific musculoskeletal injuries

Musculoskeletal Injuries Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Musculoskeletal injuries are commonly encountered by EMS providers. This two part course first defines musculoskeletal injuries including the anatomy and physiology of bones and joints, as well as types of musculoskeletal injuries. In part 2, musculoskeletal assessment and treatment principles including splinting and pain management techniques are reviewed.

• Describe musculoskeletal injury assessment and treatment principles
• Explain general splinting techniques
• Define special considerations when splinting
• Review pain management and reassessment principles

Myths and Realities of Drug Seeking Behavior (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

More Americans abuse controlled prescription medications than cocaine and heroine combined. Emergency department visits for Vicodin abuse have increased 500% in the last ten years. Drug seekers go to extreme and bizarre lengths to obtain medication. Differentiating drug abuse, tolerance, dependence, and addiction is crucial to understanding drug seeking behavior. Learn to identify traits of drug seeking behaviors and manage seekers in the field.

• To define drug dependence, drug tolerance, and drug addiction. *
• To identify the desired medications of drug seekers *
• To explain myths and realities of drug seeking behavior. *
• To understand prehospital assessment and treatment of drug seeking behavior.

Narcotics Overdose (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

EMTs and paramedics regularly encounter patients that take narcotics as prescribed or recreationally. In this course, learn about the history and pharmacology of narcotics and why they are used medicinally and recreationally. This course reviews assessment principles for a narcotics overdose event, and explains treatment and transport considerations for the narcotics overdose patient.

• Understand the history and pharmacology of narcotic analgesics
• Review assessment of the narcotics overdose event
• Explain emergency treatment and transport considerations for the overdose patient

Nausea and Vomiting (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Nausea and vomiting are frequent prehospital presentations. Vomiting can become a life threat if it obstructs the upper airway, is aspirated into the lungs, or creates a fluid and electrolyte imbalance. This course discusses related anatomy and physiology, causes, assessment considerations, and management guidelines for nausea and vomiting.

• Discuss the anatomy and physiology related to vomiting
• Explore causes of nausea and vomiting
• Describe assessment of patients suffering from persistent vomiting
• Explain management of patients suffering from persistent vomiting

NiPPV (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Fortunately for EMS providers and their respiratory distress patients, non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NiPPV) treatments are becoming widely adopted. NiPPV comes in two forms, C-PAP and Bi-PAP, and they have been shown to be a safe and effective prehospital treatment that greatly improves patient vital signs and comfort by the time of emergency department arrival. In this course learn about relevant physiology, indications, contraindications, benefits, application steps, and adjunctive therapies.

• Describe Non-invasive Positive Pressure Ventilations and physiology
• Identify the indications, contraindications, and benefits of non-invasive positive pressure ventilations
• Explain the steps to applying NiPPV and how to adjust its settings
• Discuss adjunctive therapies and ongoing monitoring for patients on NiPPV

Non-Visualized Airways Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In this two part course, we review the indications and insertion techniques for three non-visualized airways – the Combitube, laryngeal mask airway, and the King LT. Part 1 reviews airway anatomy and explores difficult airway situations. It focuses on the indications, contraindications, and insertion of the Combitube. Note that these courses should be accompanied by hands-on practice with the type or types of NVAs allowed by your service’s protocols and medical director.

• Review airway anatomy
• Explore difficult airway situations
• Describe Combitube indications, contraindications, and insertion

Non-Visualized Airways Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In this two part course, we review the indications and insertion techniques for three non-visualized airways – the Combitube, laryngeal mask airway, and the King LT. Part one reviews airway anatomy and explores difficult airway situations. Part 2 is mostly focused on the indications, contraindications, and insertion of the King LT and LMA. Note that these courses should be accompanied by hands-on practice with the type or types of NVAs allowed by your service’s protocols and medical director.

• Describe King LT and LMA indications, contraindications, and insertion

Nose Bleeds, Breaks, and Obstructions (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The nose is a gateway to airway. It assists in critical airway and breathing functions. In this course, learn about the structure of the nose, its functions, what can go wrong with the nose, and treatments for nosebleeds, breaks, and foreign body obstructions.


• To identify the major structures of the nose
• To discuss the functions of the nose
• To identify the pathophysiology of nose bleeds, breaks, and foreign bodies
• To apply treatments for nose bleeds, breaks, and foreign bodies

Obstetric Complications (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In most circumstances, pregnancy proceeds without any problems and a healthy baby is born. However, complications do occasionally arise and EMS personnel must be prepared to deal with those emergencies. Review reproductive anatomy, obstetric patient assessment, and learn to identify pregnancy and delivery complications.

• Review the anatomic structures and physiology of the reproductive system
• Discuss assessment of the obstetric patient
• Review obstetric patient treatment
• Describe pregnancy and delivery complications

Over the Counter Drug Overdoses (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Over-the-counter or OTC drug abuse is on the rise. Since 2000 there has been a four-fold increase in cold medicine abuse. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs are the 3rd most commonly intentionally overdosed medicine. Acetaminophen overdose is responsible for the greatest number of drug overdose hospital admissions. This training discusses four of the most commonly abused OTC drugs. The course also explores the importance of an accurate patient history and appropriate treatments.

• Understand who is most likely to overdose on OTC medications and what factors enhance drug-action on the body.
• Recognize the symptoms of specific OTC drug overdoses and anticipate problems for the patient.
• Explain a thorough patient assessment emphasizing the importance of accurate history.
• Identify appropriate treatments for OTC overdoses.

Pain Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Despite the ability to treat the majority of patients with pain, pain is significantly under treated in all healthcare settings, including prehospital. In this course, explore barriers to under treatment of pain, pain assessment techniques, and affirm the power of prehospital personnel to diminish patient pain. Learn pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain treatment principles.

• To understand barriers to under treatment of pain
• To assess patient pain before and after treatment
• To lessen pain with non-pharmacological and pharmacological pain treatments methods
• To identify components of a prehospital pain management protocol

Pain Transmission, Perception, and Assessment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Pain is the leading emergency medicine complaint. Patients expect EMS to acknowledge their pain, assess it and treat it. EMS, like all areas of healthcare, is not meeting this basic patient expectation. The first step in improving assessment and treatment of pain is to understand pain transmission, perception, and assessment.

• To define pain as a personal and subjective experience
• To describe pain classification methods
• To articulate the body’s process of communicating tissue damage to the brain
• To methodically assess every patients pain
• To overcome challenging pain assessment situations

Patient Care Report Essentials (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The art of constructing an organized, coherent patient care report is as important in providing appropriate care as learning to perform effective CPR. It is important that it clearly contain all the information you want to communicate. By following 13 essentials any EMS provider can improve the quality of their documentation.

• Discuss reasons for high quality documentation
• Explain steps to improve the quality of patient care reports

Pediatric Airway Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Few calls produce more anxiety for the EMS professional than the appropriate management of the pediatric airway. We must be confident in our knowledge of the airway, along with airway management tools and their use. In this course we will review the anatomy of the pediatric airway, devices to use in managing the pediatric airway, and use of pulse oximetry and capnography.

Pediatric Cardiac Emergencies (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

A congenital heart defect is an abnormality in any part of the heart that is present at birth. This course introduces the causes of pediatric cardiac emergencies, reviews relevant anatomy and physiology, explains the assessment, and discusses the management of CHDs emergencies, as well as cardiac arrest in the pediatric patient.

• Discuss causes of pediatric cardiac emergencies
• Recall relevant anatomy and physiology of cardiovascular system
• Describe focused assessment
• Discuss the implications of congenital cardiac diseases
• Discuss management of cardiac arrest in pediatric patient

Pediatric Fever (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Fever is a symptom of an illness, but concerns about fever cause inaction and mistreatment by parents and healthcare providers alike. In this course, learn the definition and causes of fever, as well as techniques to assess and treat fever in the pediatric patient population.

• Define fever in neonates and pediatric patients
• Discuss causes of fever in the pediatric patient
• Explain assessment of the pediatric patient with fever
• Explore treatment considerations for the pediatric patient with fever

Pediatric Fluid Resuscitation and Airway Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Less than 10% of ambulance calls are for pediatric patients and only a small percentage of those pediatric patients have an immediate life threatening problem. During the initial assessment quickly identify airway, breathing, and circulation problems. In this course learn causes of fluid depletion, fluid resuscitation methods, causes of respiratory system compromise, and pediatric airway management techniques.

• Explore causes of fluid depletion in pediatric patients
• Explain fluid resuscitation methods
• Discuss common causes of respiratory system compromise
• Review pediatric airway management techniques

Pediatric Ingestions (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

In this video training program paramedic, pediatric patient expert, and educator Kyle David Bates teaches pediatric assessment principles, common accident medication ingestions and their symptoms, and treatment priorities for a child with a toxic ingestion. The video includes several cases and discussion with attendees of the live presentation.

• Using a pediatric assessment tool, identify the physiological status of the child
• Identify common medications and their symptoms of ingestion
• Discuss treatment priorities in the child poisoned as the result of medication ingestions

Pediatric Patient Assessment: Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Most EMS calls are for adults. We rarely care for very sick children and our pediatric assessment and treatment skills get rusty. Understanding causes of pediatric injury and death, traits of pediatric patient age groups, and important differences in pediatric anatomy will help keep your pediatric patient assessment skills sharp.

• Review pediatric patient traits
• Explore relevant pediatric anatomy and physiology
• Discuss causes of pediatric injury and death

Pediatric Patient Assessment: Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Pediatric patients cause anxiety for many prehospital care providers. An excellent assessment is the key to understanding the patient’s problems and reducing your anxiety. In this course explore pediatric patient assessment techniques, principles for immobilizing pediatric patients, and issues in pediatric patient transport.

• Discuss pediatric patient assessment techniques
• Explore principles for immobilizing pediatric patients
• Explain issues in pediatric patient transport

Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies: Lower Airway (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Although pediatric patients typically make up only about ten percent of all EMS calls, breathing difficulty is a common chief complaint. Calls involving respiratory difficulty are often anxiety producing, but a younger patient in distress can create an even higher level of apprehension. This course explores the causes of, as well as the assessments and treatments for pediatric respiratory emergencies in the lower airway.

Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies: Upper Airway (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Although pediatric patients typically make up only about ten percent of all EMS calls, breathing difficulty is a common chief complaint. Calls involving respiratory difficulty are often anxiety producing, but a younger patient in distress can create an even higher level of apprehension. This course explores the causes of, as well as the assessments and treatments for pediatric respiratory emergencies in the upper airway.

Pelvic Injuries and Stabilization (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Patients with unstable pelvic fractures are at a high risk of fatality from major blood loss. Understanding the anatomy of the pelvis and surrounding structures and the types of pelvic fractures that can occur helps the EMT recognize and provide in-field stabilization of a pelvic fracture. There are several methods to stabilize a fractured pelvis, but all share the goal of circumferential compression and reduction.

• To review pelvis anatomy and the structures protected by the pelvis.
• To describe mechanisms of injury for pelvic fractures.
• To assess pelvic fracture instability.
• To describe methods to stabilize a pelvic fracture.

Pharmacology and Drug Administration (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Why are some drugs administered through an I-V, while other drugs the patient chews and swallows, and yet some are injected and even inhaled? This course discusses how medications enter, and act on, our bodies. The course specifically reviews medications for the treatment of chest pain, hypoglycemia, anaphylaxis, asthma, and toxin ingestion.

• Review basic pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics
• Explore essentials of drug administration
• Discuss the indications and use of specific medications

Pharmacology Special Considerations (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Why do children need special medication doses? How is their body different from an adults? Are there other types of patients that should also be given special consideration? This course discusses special medication considerations for pediatric, geriatric, and obstetrical patients.

• Review anatomical and physiological differences specific to drug administration to pediatric patients.
• Discuss pediatric pain management
• Explore difference specific to drug administration to geriatric patients.
• Explain drug safety and commonly used obstetrical

Poisons and Toxins Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Anything ingested, inhaled, absorbed or injected in a great enough amount can be poisonous. How you treat patients who have been poisoned depends on the type of poison, the route of transmission, its effects, and what additional life threats they have suffered. In this course, we will define poisons, explore the routes of transmission and discuss general medical care for patients who have been poisoned.

• Define poisons
• Describe poison transmission routes
• Review emergency medical care of poisons

Poisons and Toxins Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

We often think of poison emergencies only as accidental or intentional drug overdoses. However, poison emergencies can happen to anyone and don’t always involve drugs. In this course, we will review types of poison emergencies, describe general treatment and assessment principles, overview commonly encountered poisons, and provide resources to find more information.

• Review types of poison emergencies
• Describe general assessment and treatment principles
• Overview commonly encountered poisons

Pre-hospital Pediatric Resuscitation (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Dr. Peter Antevy, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physician, presents background and statistics about pediatric resuscitation, reviews the concepts and evidence for age and length based resuscitation, explore pediatric resuscitation using a hybrid technique, and introduces a vision for the future of pediatrics and EMS.

• Discuss the background of pediatric resuscitation
• Describe age and length based systems for pediatric resuscitation
• Explore the future of pediatric resuscitation

Recognition and Treatment of Foot Injuries (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

We use our feet in nearly every daily activity and subject our feet to continual abuse. The average person walks about 1,000 miles per year. However, because of improper foot wear, lack of conditioning, traumatic events, and overuse 43.1 million Americans have foot problems. This course discusses assessment and treatment of common foot injuries seen by prehospital providers.

• To identify the structural anatomy of the foot.
• To understand the factors that increase the risk for foot injury
• To explore how the mechanism of injury predicts foot injury patterns
• To explain a detailed foot exam
• To discuss general and specific treatments for foot injuries.

Recognition and Treatment of Heat Emergencies (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The body is most comfortable and efficient in a narrow temperature range. A complex arrangement of sensation and feedback mechanisms work continuously to maintain a normal core temperature. Every year, thousands of Americans are treated for heat emergencies and several hundred patients are killed by heat stroke every year. With this course, learn to recognize and treat heat emergencies.

• Review the physiology of thermoregulation
• Explore causes of heat emergencies
• Identify patients at increased risk of heat emergencies
• Differentiate types of heat emergencies
• Understand techniques to assess and treat heat emergencies

Recognition, Prevention, and Management of Sepsis (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Each year over 750,000 patients are diagnosed with severe sepsis in the United States. Although most common in the hospital, sepsis often strikes patients in the out-of-hospital setting. There are many reasons for the frequency increase—an aging population, increasing frequency of immunosuppressant diseases, and an increase of drug-resistant bacteria. This training discusses the physiology and treatment of sepsis.

• Understand some basic sepsis terms, including the definition of what sepsis is and what it is not
• Recognize the demographics of those most at risk for sepsis, and sepsis mortality
• Explain the pathology of an infection as it affects the body
• Understand the importance of, and how to prevent infection in the prehospital setting
• Use a thorough assessment to recognize sepsis and provide aggressive management

Renal Failure (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Many medical conditions may result from malfunctioning or non-functioning kidneys. In this course, you will learn the role that the kidneys play in the overall function of the human body and how diseased kidneys affect normal body function.

• Review kidney anatomy and physiology
• Define renal failure and various types of renal disease
• Discuss common medical conditions that result from or cause renal
• Overview types of dialysis
• Explore key assessment and management principles for a renal failure patient

Respiratory Protection and Tuberculosis

1 hr
4 5

The purpose of a respiratory protection program is to minimize risk to EMS providers from respiratory hazards, like tuberculosis, during the performance of regular job duties. This course introduces the OSHA respiratory protection standard, describes TB transmission, symptoms, and treatment, and explains the relevant elements of a respiratory protection program for EMS providers.

• Introduce OSHA requirements for a respiratory protection program
• Describe TB transmission, signs and symptoms, and treatment
• Explain the relevant elements of a respiratory protection program for EMS providers

Seizure Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Chances are you have treated many patients who have experienced a seizure or multiple seizures. This course reviews many of the different causes and types of seizures as well as the most up to date treatments.

• Explore causes of seizures
• Describe types of seizures and what happens to the body during different types of seizures
• Review seizure assessment and treatment principles

Selective Spinal Immobilization (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

Many patients experience a mechanism of injury for the spine, but very few actually have a spinal cord or column injury. In this course learn about a selective spinal immobilization protocol can be used to reduce the frequency of unnecessary spinal immobilization. You will review relevant statistics, discuss risks and side effects of immobilization, and learn about protocol components.

• Review statistics related to spinal column and spinal cord injuries.
• Discuss the side effects and risks of spinal immobilization.
• Learn the proper application of a selective spinal immobilization protocol including exclusionary criteria.

Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

1 hr
4 5

A joke with an offensive innuendo. A request for a sexual favor. A picture of a nude body on a computer screen saver. All of these examples at the workplace qualify as sexual harassment. Sexual harassment at work happens all too often. Patients, coworkers and supervisors may sexually harass you. This course will explore the incidences of sexual harassment, risk factors and prevention techniques.

• Define sexual harassment
• Discuss the incidence of sexual harassment
• Explore risk factors for sexual harassment
• Describe elements of a sexual harassment policy

Shock and Shock Management (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

In a very broad sense, shock is inadequate capillary perfusion. It must be recognized, however, that shock is not a singular event with a specific cause or treatment. It is a complex group of physiological abnormalities caused by a variety of disease states and injuries. In this course, learn about shock and shock management.

• Describe A&P of cardiovascular system
• Explain various stages of shock
• Explore assessment findings with shock
• Discuss treatment plan for shock
• Introduce concept of acute stress reaction

Slips, Trips, and Fall Prevention

1 hr
4 5

Slips, trips and falls can happen in any workplace. But the consequences of emergency response personnel falling on the job can be much greater than those in the rest of the workforce. Slips, trips and falls include any injuries that cause lost work time. Slips, trips and falls may result in trivial injuries to catastrophic injuries. In this course learn common causes, hazards, and injuries. As well as safety techniques and prevention practices for EMTs and firefighters.

• Define slips, trips and falls
• Discuss common causes, hazards and injuries
• Describe safety techniques and prevention practices

Smallpox (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Smallpox is an infectious disease that has been responsible for millions of deaths. Right now smallpox is eradicated from the human population. However, many fear smallpox will be reintroduced by terrorists. This course discusses smallpox history, causes, symptoms, vaccination, and pandemic planning.

• Define smallpox
• Discuss the causes and symptoms of smallpox
• Discuss prevention, preparation and treatment principles for emergency service personnel

Snowmobile Trauma (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The popularity of recreational snowmobiling continues to grow in Canada and the northern regions of the United States. With the increase in popularity has come an increase in size and speed of the machines and those of us in EMS know that means an increase in crashes, injuries and fatalities. In this course learn assessment and management techniques specific to snowmobile trauma.

• Review the statistics associated with snowmobile crashes
• Discuss the importance of EMT safety in snowmobile crash rescues
• Understand common mechanisms of injury in snowmobile traumas
• Learn assessment points specific to snowmobile injuries
• Review management techniques for snowmobile trauma

Special K: Ketamine Abuse (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Emergency care for patients under the influence of street drugs is demanding and dangerous. The list of substances which may be abused is extensive and is constantly changing as the result of shifting trends in popularity, availability, cost, and appearance. This course will examine a popular street drug known as ketamine or Special K.

• Discuss the history, common names, and pharmacology of ketamine ingestion.
• Recognize the signs and symptoms related to ketamine abuse.
• Explore assessment and treatment considerations for patients suffering from the effects of ketamine abuse.

Spinal Injury Assessment and Treatment Part 1 (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Injuries to the spinal cord can have catastrophic consequences for patients and their families. In some patients, the boney vertebrae of the spinal column may be damaged but the cord itself may be intact. Although it is exceedingly rare, an unstable spinal column with an undamaged spinal cord is a significant treatment and transport challenge. Part 1 of this course reviews spinal column anatomy, describes mechanisms of injury, and explores several assessment principles.

• Review anatomy of the spinal column and spinal cord.
• Discuss mechanisms of injury and how the spine can be injured.
• Explore assessment considerations for a patient suspected of having a spinal injury.

Spinal Injury Assessment and Treatment Part 2 (ALS)

1 hr
3 5

Injuries to the spinal cord can have catastrophic consequences for patients and their families. In some patients, the boney vertebrae of the spinal column may be damaged but the cord itself may be intact. Although it is exceedingly rare, an unstable spinal column with an undamaged spinal cord is a significant treatment and transport challenge. Part 2 of this course covers spinal immobilization techniques and immobilization challenges.

• Discuss spinal immobilization techniques
• Explore spinal immobilization challenges
• Introduce future considerations for prehospital spinal cord injury treatment

Sports Medicine for EMS

1 hr
4 5

EMS is often asked to standby at or respond to injured or ill athletes that are receiving care from athletic trainers. Because of the different role they play, athletic trainers have a different philosophical approach to injury and illness than EMS providers. Understanding this difference can make interfacing with them easier and more importantly improves patient care. Learn about those philosophical differences, pre-planning considerations, and athletic trainer qualifications.

• Explore differences in EMS and sports medicine philosophies towards injury assessment and treatment
• Discuss sport’s venue pre-planning
• Review general considerations when responding to sports venues
• Understand athletic trainer qualifications and training
• Introduce how to best liaison with athletic trainers

Stress in the Workplace

1 hr
4 5

All workers are susceptible to stress, but emergency medical workers work in an environment filled with stress factors. Stress is stress the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. This course explores causes, effects and techniques to reduce stress on the job.

• Define stress
• Discuss causes of workplace stress
• Discuss the effects of stress
• Describe stress reduction techniques

Stroke Assessment and Treatment (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Strokes kill more than 150,000 people per year making it the third leading cause of death. Unfortunately, less than half of stroke patients access EMS for help. In this course learn stroke types, important assessment findings, and appropriate treatment. This course includes the updated information on stroke assessment and treatment from the 2005 American Heart Association Guidelines for CPR and Emergency Cardiac Care. It also discusses the recently released Give Me 5 for Stroke public awareness campaign.

• Describe and discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and types of stroke.
• Discuss the assessment finding associated with stroke.
• Formulate a treatment plan for the management of stroke.

Suicide - Deliberate Death (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Suicide is a leading cause of death in the United States. Warning signs were usually present in individuals who successfully commit suicide. Suicide is preventable and as an emergency responder, you may be the only one who notices the patient’s warning signs. In this course learn about suicide, risk factors, warning signs and how to handle a suicidal patient.

• Define suicide
• Describe at risk populations
• Overview warning signs
• Review assessment and treatment principles
• Describe preventative measures for emergency response personnel

The Human Body Part 1 - Critical Systems (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Understanding the structure and functions of the critical systems in our bodies will allows you to speak the language of medicine, clearly identify the location of injuries when communicating with other medical providers, and know what lies beneath the skin, including the structures you cannot see. Part one of this course reviews the body’s critical systems.

• Review history of anatomy and physiology
• Identify topographic terms
• Describe the anatomy and function of the circulatory system
• Describe the anatomy and function of the respiratory system
• Describe the anatomy and function of the nervous system

The Human Body Part 2 - Other Systems (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Understanding the structure and functions of the systems in our bodies will allows you to speak the language of medicine, clearly identify the location of injuries when communicating with other medical providers, and know what lies beneath the skin, including the structures you cannot see. Part two of this course reviews the body’s other systems.

• Review topographic terms
• Describe the anatomy and function of the musculoskeletal system
• Describe the anatomy and function of the integumentary system
• Describe the anatomy and function of the gastrointestinal system
• Describe the anatomy and function of the genitourinary system
• Describe the anatomy and function of the endocrine system

Traumatic Brain Injury (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

A blow to the head can result in many different problems of varying severity – from a simple soft tissue injury to a Traumatic Brain Injury, which can develop into a life threatening condition known as Elevated Intracranial Pressure. In this course learn how to determine the presence of a TBI, recognize elevated ICP and to assess and treat a patient with a TBI.

• Explore brain anatomy and TBI pathophysiology
• Determine the presence or absence of a TBI
• Assess the likelihood of developing Elevated ICP
• Recognize Elevated ICP in its early stages
• Describe treatment of a patient with a TBI
• Describe the treatment of a patient with Elevated ICP

Tricyclic Antidepressant Overdose (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Since tricyclic antidepressants are widely prescribed to treat patients with major depressive disorders they are frequently available to the suicidal patient. In 2004, there were over 12,000 reported TCA overdoses. In this course learn TCA indications, pharmacology, and assessment and treatment of TCA overdose patients.

• Describe the indications for TCA medications
• Explore the pharmacology of TCA medications
• Discuss assessment and treatment of TCA overdose patients

Understanding and Restraining Patients with Excited Delirium (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Excited delirium is a severe medical problem. Patient restraint, especially sudden death while restrained, is a “hot topic” in healthcare and EMS. Learn to recognize excited delirium and principles for verbal, physical and chemical restraint for agitated excited patients.

• Describe the signs and symptoms of excited delirium
• Identify the factors that make excited delirium a severe medical problem
• Describe general principles for caring for patients with excited delirium, including restraint
• Describe controversies related to restraining, treating, and monitoring a patient with excited delirium

Understanding Dementia (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Dementia is not actually a specific disease. It is defined as a collection of symptoms caused by a number of disorders that affect the brain. In this course learn about types of dementia, daily management techniques, and assessment and management principles for patients with dementia.

• Review definition of and prevalence of dementia
• Review types of dementia
• Learn modalities used in daily management of dementia
• Learn techniques for assessing and managing dementia patients

Understanding the Hazard Communication Standard

1 hr
4 5

EMS personnel have the “right-to-know” about the hazards and the identities of the chemicals they are exposed to in the workplace. When EMS personnel have this information, they can participate in their employers’ protective programs and take steps to protect themselves from hazardous chemicals. This course reviews the hazard communications standard, safety data sheet requirements, purpose of labels, and protective measures.

• Identify the purpose and elements of the hazard communication standard
• Discuss the purpose and key requirements of the Safety Data Safety Sheet
• Explain the purpose of and key requirements of labels
• Review health information concepts, terms, and protective measures

Unusual Resuscitation Situations: Environmental Emergencies (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

The logical conclusion of any environmental emergency is cardiac arrest. When an environmental emergency progresses to respiratory and/or cardiac arrest, standard treatment is less likely to succeed. This presentation seeks to increase knowledge to help guide assessment and treatment for unusual resuscitation situations resulting from the environmental emergencies of drowning, severe hypothermia, and being struck by lightning.

• To identify unusual resuscitation situations resulting from environmental emergencies
• To explain the underlying pathophysiology that complicates respiratory and cardiac resuscitation from an environmental emergency
• To describe treatment for respiratory and cardiac arrest resulting from an environmental emergency
• To list reasons to not begin CPR

Weapons of Mass Destruction - An Intro to WMD Agents (ALS)

1 hr
4 5

Following the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the Centers for Disease Control in recommended that health care professionals – including emergency responders – watch for any unusual disease patterns or symptoms that would suggest the intentional release of infectious biological, chemical, or radioactive agents by either foreign or domestic terrorists. This course is an introduction to WMD agents.

• Discuss the history, delivery, and detection of biological, chemical and radioactive warfare agents.
• Discuss the pathophysiology of biological, chemical and radioactive warfare agents.
• Formulate a treatment plan for patients exposed to biological, chemical or radioactive warfare agents.
• Describe measures emergency responders can take to protect themselves against biological, chemical or radioactive warfare agents.

Workplace Diversity

1 hr
3 5

The United States continues to be one of the most diverse countries in the world. Along with the benefits to diversity come many challenges for emergency response personnel. This course examines what diversity means, how culture and diversity differ, and successful diversity strategies at work.

• Define diversity
• Discuss effects of diversity at work
• Discuss successful diversity strategies at work

Workplace Violence

1 hr
3 5

If you have not been threatened, hit by, spit on, or verbally harassed by a patient, it is only a matter of time. Unfortunately, we know that most EMS personnel, like all healthcare workers, will be victims of workplace violence. This course explores the impact of violence on the EMS workplace by defining workplace violence, discussing risk factors, and exploring components of a workplace violence prevention program.

• Define workplace violence
• Discuss the incidence of workplace violence
• Explore risk factors for workplace violence
• Describe elements of a workplace violence prevention program

All Certifications

  • Arkansas EMS
    • Advanced Airway Management 6.0 hrs
    • Airway Management (infant & Child) 2.0 hrs
    • Allergic Reaction 2.0 hrs
    • Basic Airway Management 2.0 hrs
    • Burns (infant & Child) 1 hr
    • Cardiac Emergencies (infant & Child) 4.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular System/Emergencies 13.0 hrs
    • Communicable Diseases 10.0 hrs
    • Environmental Emergencies 8.0 hrs
    • Injuries to the Central Nervous System 1 hr
    • Inter-Personal Communication Skills 4.0 hrs
    • Lifting and Moving Patients 3.0 hrs
    • Medical Patient Assessment 44.0 hrs
    • Medical Patient Assessment (infant & Child) 11.0 hrs
    • Overview of Behavioral Emergencies 2.0 hrs
    • Pharmacology 3.0 hrs
    • Respiratory Emergencies (infant & Child) 2.0 hrs
    • Respiratory System/Emergencies 1 hr
    • Shock 3.0 hrs
    • Thoracoabdominal Trauma 2.0 hrs
    • Toxicology, Alcoholism & Drug Abuse 9.0 hrs
    • Trauma Assessment 16.0 hrs
    • Trauma Patient Assessment (infant & Child) 1 hr
    • Vascular Access/Intraosseous (infant & Child) 1 hr
  • CCEMT-P
    • Continuing Education 70.0 hrs
  • Colorado EMS
    • Airway 4.0 hrs
    • Airway, Breathing and Cardiology 28.0 hrs
    • Medical 52.0 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral 4.0 hrs
    • OB 4.0 hrs
    • Operational 31.0 hrs
    • Pediatric 18.0 hrs
    • Preparatory 23.0 hrs
    • Trauma 32.0 hrs
  • Florida EMS
    • Airway 15.0 hrs
    • Cardiology 8.0 hrs
    • HIV/AIDS 2.0 hrs
    • Medical 57.5 hrs
    • Obstetrics and Pediatrics 21.0 hrs
    • Operations 28.0 hrs
    • Pediatric Emergencies 10.0 hrs
    • Trauma 30.0 hrs
  • FP-C
    • Other 69.0 hrs
  • Georgia EMS
    • Cardiac Care 28.0 hrs
    • Pediatric Care 22.0 hrs
    • Trauma Care 82.0 hrs
  • ICCR
    • Airway, Respiration & Ventilation 25.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular & Resuscitation 6.0 hrs
    • Medical & OB/GYN 74.5 hrs
    • Trauma 33.0 hrs
  • Idaho EMS
    • Airway, Respiration, and Ventilation 21.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular 19.0 hrs
    • Medical 77.5 hrs
    • Operations: Landing Zone & Extrication Awareness 11.0 hrs
    • Pediatrics 21.0 hrs
    • Trauma 36.0 hrs
  • Kansas EMS
    • Advanced 156.0 hrs
    • Airway, Respiration & Ventilation 14.0 hrs
    • Airway, Respiration & Ventilation: ALS Airway Management 11.0 hrs
    • Airway, Respiration & Ventilation: Ventilation/Oxygenation 3.0 hrs
    • Basic 30.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular 15.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular: 4 & 12 Lead ECG 3.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular: ACS/Chest Pain 2.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular: Cardiac Arrest 13.0 hrs
    • Cardiovascular: Pharmacology/Medication Administration 1 hr
    • Cardiovascular: Stroke 1 hr
    • Medical 66.0 hrs
    • Medical: Altered Mental Status 8.0 hrs
    • Medical: Communicable Diseases 7.0 hrs
    • Medical: OB/Neonate Emergency 8.0 hrs
    • Medical: Pharmacology/Medication Administration 6.0 hrs
    • Medical: Respiratory Emergency 2.0 hrs
    • Operations 22.0 hrs
    • Operations: Communications 2.0 hrs
    • Operations: Hazardous Materials 1 hr
    • Operations: MCI/Triage 1 hr
    • Operations: Vehicle Operations/Transport Considerations 1 hr
    • Trauma 22.0 hrs
    • Trauma: CNS Injury 2.0 hrs
    • Trauma: Shock Management 3.0 hrs
    • Trauma: Soft Tissue/Musculoskeletal 23.0 hrs
  • Kentucky EMS
    • Airway, Breathing and Cardiology 29.0 hrs
    • Airway Management 19.0 hrs
    • Cardiac Management 10.0 hrs
    • Disaster Management or Mass Casualty Incidents 1 hr
    • Electives 41.5 hrs
    • HIV/AIDS 2.0 hrs
    • Medical Emergencies 52.5 hrs
    • Medical or Behavioral Emergencies 55.5 hrs
    • Obstetrics 5.0 hrs
    • Obstetrics or Gynecology 5.0 hrs
    • Obstetrics or Gynecology, Infants and Children 1 hr
    • Operations 10.0 hrs
    • Pediatrics 18.0 hrs
    • Preparatory 21.0 hrs
    • Trauma 32.0 hrs
  • Maine EMS
    • Airway, Breathing, Circulation 31.0 hrs
    • Assessment 5.0 hrs
    • Category 2 - BLS Topics 1.5 hrs
    • Category 4 - ALS Topics 113.0 hrs
    • Medical 52.0 hrs
    • Obstetrics, Pediatrics 22.0 hrs
    • Preparatory, Operations 31.0 hrs
    • Trauma 30.0 hrs
  • Maryland EMS
    • 2 33.5 hrs
    • A 72.0 hrs
    • B 50.0 hrs
    • L-Local Option 27.5 hrs
    • M-Medical 10.0 hrs
    • T-Trauma 2.0 hrs
  • Michigan EMS
    • Airway/Ventilation 27.0 hrs
    • Medical 55.5 hrs
    • Operations 11.0 hrs
    • Operations.Emergency Preparedness 3.0 hrs
    • Patient Assessment 1 hr
    • Preparatory 20.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations 5.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Pediatrics 11.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Pediatrics: Airway 10.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Pediatrics: Assessment 6.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Pediatrics: Medical 8.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Pediatrics: Trauma 1 hr
    • Trauma 32.0 hrs
  • Missouri EMS
    • Airway 2.0 hrs
    • Airway Management & Ventilation 38.0 hrs
    • Elective 10.0 hrs
    • Medical 46.5 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral 8.5 hrs
    • OB, Infants, Children 1 hr
    • Operations 9.0 hrs
    • Preparatory 12.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations 25.0 hrs
    • Trauma 35.0 hrs
  • Nevada EMS
    • Cardiac 28.0 hrs
    • Medical 55.0 hrs
    • Pediatric/Geriatric 23.0 hrs
    • Related Specialty Areas 27.0 hrs
    • Trauma 31.0 hrs
  • New York EMS
    • Advanced Airway Management / Ventilation (AEMT) 8.0 hrs
    • Airway 12.0 hrs
    • Airway Management & Ventilation 12.0 hrs
    • Cardiology 5.0 hrs
    • EMS Operations 7.0 hrs
    • Endocrine/Neurology 1.5 hrs
    • Immunology/Toxicology 1 hr
    • Medical (AEMT) 60.0 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral.Allergic Reactions and Poisoning (EMT-CC) 10.0 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral.Environmental/Behavioral/Gynecological (EMT-CC) 13.0 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral.Neurological & Abdominal Emergencies (EMT-CC) 20.5 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral.Respiratory & Cardiac Emergencies (EMT-CC) 24.0 hrs
    • Medical.Environmental Conditions/Infectious & Communicable Diseases/Behavioral 14.0 hrs
    • Medical.Gastroentaerology/Renal & Urology/Toxicology/Hematology 16.0 hrs
    • Medical.Gynecology and Obstetrics 3.0 hrs
    • Medical.Neurology/Endocrinology/Allergies & Anaphylaxis 14.5 hrs
    • Medical.Pulmonary and Cardiology 21.0 hrs
    • OB/Neonate/Pediatrics 12.0 hrs
    • Operations 13.0 hrs
    • Patient Assessment 7.0 hrs
    • Pharmacology (AEMT) 2.0 hrs
    • Pharmacology/Med Admin/Emergency Meds 1 hr
    • Preparatory 24.0 hrs
    • Respiratory 1 hr
    • Shock and Resuscitation 1 hr
    • Special Considerations.Abuse and Assault 1 hr
    • Special Considerations.Neonatology and Pediatrics 18.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Neonatology (EMT-CC) 3.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Obstetric Emergencies (EMT-CC) 2.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Patients w/Special Challenges & Acute Interventions for Chronic Care Patients 3.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations.Pediatrics (EMT-CC) 16.0 hrs
    • Trauma 29.0 hrs
  • New York FIRE
    • OSHA - Fire Station Safety 2.0 hrs
    • OSHA - General Hazard Recognition 1 hr
    • OSHA - Protective Clothing 2.0 hrs
  • North Carolina EMS
    • Airway Management 26.0 hrs
    • Medical 55.5 hrs
    • Operations 13.0 hrs
    • Patient Assessment 1 hr
    • Preparatory 18.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations 22.0 hrs
    • Trauma 32.0 hrs
  • NREMT
    • Airway 2.0 hrs
    • Airway, Breathing and Cardiology 29.0 hrs
    • Childbirth & Children 1 hr
    • Circulation 2.0 hrs
    • Illness & Injury 3.5 hrs
    • Medical/Behavioral 3.5 hrs
    • Medical Emergencies 52.5 hrs
    • OB, Infants, Children 1 hr
    • Obstetrics and Pediatrics 21.0 hrs
    • Operational Tasks 31.0 hrs
    • Preparatory 24.0 hrs
    • Trauma 32.0 hrs
  • Ohio EMS
    • AED 1 hr
    • Airway & Oxygen Administration 1 hr
    • Anaphylaxis & Patient Assisted Epinephrine Administration 1 hr
    • Emergency Cardiac Care 22.0 hrs
    • General Topics 88.5 hrs
    • Geriatric 5.0 hrs
    • Illness & Injury Management 3.5 hrs
    • Patient Assessment 1 hr
    • Pediatrics 25.0 hrs
    • Trauma 32.0 hrs
  • Oregon EMS
    • Airway, Breathing, and Cardiology 45.0 hrs
    • Educational Topics Approved by the Medical Director 44.5 hrs
    • Medical Emergencies 76.5 hrs
    • Miscellaneous EMS Topics 32.0 hrs
    • Pediatric and Obstetric Emergencies 23.0 hrs
    • Trauma Emergencies 40.0 hrs
  • Pennsylvania EMS
    • Medical/Trauma 101.5 hrs
    • Other 14.0 hrs
  • Texas EMS
    • Airway Management / Ventilation 19.0 hrs
    • Clinically Related Operations 8.0 hrs
    • Medical 62.5 hrs
    • Patient Assessment 7.0 hrs
    • Pediatric 21.0 hrs
    • Preparatory 18.0 hrs
    • Special Considerations 25.0 hrs
    • Trauma 31.0 hrs
  • Utah EMS
    • Airway Management, Respiration and Artifical Ventilation 22.0 hrs
    • Anatomy and Physiology 28.0 hrs
    • Assessment 27.0 hrs
    • EMS Operations 19.0 hrs
    • Life Span Development 2.0 hrs
    • Medical Terminology 5.0 hrs
    • Medicine 49.0 hrs
    • Pathophysiology 12.0 hrs
    • Pediatrics 18.0 hrs
    • Pharmacology 13.0 hrs
    • Preparatory 10.0 hrs
    • Public Health 10.0 hrs
    • Shock and Resuscitation 13.0 hrs
    • Special Patient Populations 11.0 hrs
    • Trauma 30.0 hrs
  • Virginia
    • ALS Area 16 12.0 hrs
    • ALS Area 17 21.0 hrs
    • ALS Area 18 39.0 hrs
    • ALS Area 19 41.0 hrs
    • ALS Area 20 3.0 hrs
    • BLS Area 11 1 hr
    • BLS Area 12 1 hr
    • BLS Area 13 5.0 hrs
    • BLS Area 14 10.5 hrs
    • BLS Area 15 2.0 hrs
    • Category 2 25.0 hrs
  • Wyoming EMS First Responder
    • Childbirth, Pediatric Emergencies 2.0 hrs
    • EMS Operations 3.0 hrs
    • Medical Emergencies 7.5 hrs
    • Patient Assessment 1 hr
    • Preparatory 18.0 hrs
    • Trauma Emergencies 2.0 hrs

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